The Anti-Writing Writer

Preposition at the end of a sentence? YES PLEASE! I have no need to adhere to rules meant for Latin.

Passive verbs? Sometimes it just sounds better that way (and I’ve heard Twilight is chock full of passive sentences….didn’t seem to hinder it any šŸ˜› )

Adverbs? I swear, I looked long and hard but I just don’t see any reason to nix them as long as you’re not relying on them to tell instead of show or when you could be describing an action more creatively. I *like* adverbs, honestly. I think they add color and I think sometimes when I find writing dry, it’s because it just needs more adverbs. šŸ˜‰ I just used two adverbs šŸ˜”

I’m reading The Fire in Fiction. This is a helpful book and I agree with a lot of the ideas…but I find the examples really boring. I also really don’t like Maass’ writing style… I mean “Who are the most eccentric people of your acquaintance?” Who talks like that?! I guess he does but personally I think it sounds silly.

hee hee hee…..you know, I just bet he’s trying to avoid writing “Who are the most eccentric people you’re acquainted with?” OMG ENDS IN A PREP OMG WAIT EXCEPT IT SOUNDS WAY BETTER THAT WAY! I wish I could find the other sentence that threw me for a loop…it was so ridiculously convoluted and unnecessary.

I think this is the risk of writing “rules”…. no one rule really covers everything. All rules can, and have, been broken successfully. The trick is being aware of the rules–knowing when you’re breaking them successfully and when breaking the rule really is weakening your writing unnecessarily.

Actually the great thing about The Fire in Fiction is that Maass tends to give you examples that contradict the norm and why they still work. For example, typically the rule is “NEVER start with scene description, ALWAYS start with action and a direct personal attachment to the character” but then he quotes a successful novel that starts out with description–description that involves tension, but still, personality-less description.

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